Unshelved ~ What I Read in December

Reading is a habit and discipline of life that I believe should be instilled and cultivated into every generation. I set my reading course at the beginning of the year and at the beginning of the month I set aside a few moments to establish my plan for the month (all with some flexibility of course). It was my goal for 2016 to read through 104 books for the year, and am thankful that I was permitted to complete it just this past week, a mere four days before the year ended. Admittedly with the busyness of the past few months I have read less than I had endeavored, but was still privileged to make my way through several good books through December.
So what did I read this month:
  1. God’s Word Alone by Matthew Barrett: As part of the Five Solas Series meant to recapture the convictions of the reformers, God’s Word Alone by Matthew Barrett was a far better read than I expected. Barrett does a wonderful job of setting forth the priority of Scripture through the biblical narrative, historical narrative, and systematic narrative. You can read my review of it here.
  2. Biblical Counseling Guide for Women by John and Janie Street: The title is misleading in that this is a book that could translate to either gender. There were some great insights and good application points in this book, and yet there were some diminishing features as well. You can read my review of it here.
  3. Working with God Through Prayer by D. Edmond Hiebert: There is much that can be learned from the writings of D. Edmond Hiebert, and there were some great insights in this short book on prayer. You can read my review of it here.
  4. Rough Riders by Mark Lee Gardner: I try to mix in one book a month that looks at history, whether Christian or secular. Since its release this one has been highly recommended, so when it went on sale around Thanksgiving, I picked it up to read. I was not disappointed to learn about Teddy Roosevelt, the Rough Riders, and past involvement in Cuba.
  5. Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson: I picked up this series right after it was released at the recommendation of a friend. I had forgotten I had the series until recently and decided I should go ahead and read it to see what the popularity was all about. I actually enjoyed the storyline itself. I simply found it intriguing. However, it is a bit graphic, including a casual treatment of sex, some language, and the ending includes a complete display of man’s depravity.
  6.  The Best of Archie’s Comics – 75 Years, 75 Stories: For a bit of variety I try to read a couple of comic books a year. Definitely secular in nature, this seems like on odd pick, but it’s more nostalgic than anything. As a young boy my dad would come across them at work destined for the recycle bin, so he would bring them for me to read.
As the new year comes around, I would urge reading to be one of the most important goals that you add to your list, first that of Scripture, and second to read other books (with a mixture of some good theological/Christian living books and some pleasurable fiction).