Unshelved: What I Read in March

Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers
~
Charles William Eliot
 
As part of my routine blogging, I am constantly trying to expose the importance of reading. Part of that includes motivating others with what I have read over the past month. In this edition you will see several that I have read for book reviews, a couple of commentaries, and some fiction books from a series I simply enjoy reading.  The first three include book reviews, and if interested, clicking on the title will take you to purchase the books mentioned here. So here is what I read in March:
1) The Expositor’s Bible Handbook: Old Testament by Dr. Greg Harris: The title may seem intimidating, and it is geared towards pastors seeking to prepare their sermon, but this is an incredible book more about studying the Bible. It is a book that I recommend without hesitation and you can read my review of the book by clicking here.
2) The Curious Christian by Barnabas Piper: I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this work by Barnabas Piper. Piper does a great job of not only explaining curiosity, but bringing forth principles to engage it for Christian growth. You can read my full review of this book by clicking here.
3) Work and Our Labor in the Lord by James Hamilton Jr.: After becoming a Christian, I failed to make the connection between my faith and my work. It’s unfortunate that such a basic concept goes untaught. Hamilton, who does well at teaching on a given topic from a biblical theology perspective and he does well at examining work across all of Scripture. You can read my review of this book by clicking here.
4) John (Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament) by Edward Klink III: I am a big fan of the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament and am looking forward to its completion. So far they have released 11 of a planned 20 volumes, the most recent being the Gospel of John.
5) James, 1 & 2 Peter, & Jude (Teach the Text Commentary Series) Jim Samra: Baker Books had plans for a commentary series on the entire Bible, yet after releasing about half the volumes have cancelled the series following the release of a several volumes in 2017 and 2018 (and even those releases have been scaled down to not include the color coding and pictures of previous releases). It bothers me when things are unfinished and yet, there are some concerns about the series that makes the move by Baker Books unsurprising. Realistically, I wasn’t very impressed with this particular volume.
6) Quick Tips for Busy Families by Jay Payleitner: I was really excited about this book when asked to review it. However, I found it to be lacking quite a bit. Basically it is a book of varying tips for families of how to spend time together and grow the relationship. However, these are very basic and often very situation specific, so often times not they are not feasible for everyone. A quick search on the internet could come up with similar results. You can read my review of the book here.
7) At Home with Books by Estelle Ellis and Caroline Seebohm: Last year I came across a slew of great coffee table books about books. Those quickly made it to my wish list and I have been fortunate to collect a couple of them recently. This one is a photo essay of collector’s personal libraries. The book is a bit dated (from the 90’s) but it was a fun read with some good quotes throughout.
8) The ESV Reader’s Bible: The Pentateuch: Many Bible readers were quite excited when Crossway released a six-volume set of the ESV Reader’s Bible in October. The sheer quality of the set is quite pleasing, but even more important is the reading experience of the Bible. As I follow my Bible reading plan for 2017, I have been utilizing this set , finishing the first volume (Genesis – Deuteronomy) in March.
9) Plague Ship by Clive Cussler: I enjoy reading fiction, especially at the end of a long day. Last year I discovered author Clive Cussler and have enjoyed his writing because every book I have read so far has been unpredictable. He has several series going, and I have been working my way through The Oregon Files which currently consists of 11 books (and one more planned for 2017).
10) Corsair by Clive Cussler: Corsair immediately follows Plague Ship listed above, so it was merely a continuation of what I already read.
Everyone reads at different levels and speeds, but they key is to be reading. So what have you read this month?