Unshelved: What I Read In January 2018

I look forward to the commencement of a new year, not because of the normal reasons though. It’s because I can begin anew with reading goals and ambitions. So far this year, I have not been disappointed. As January comes to a close, here’s a look at what I read this month (click on the links to learn more details about the book).

The Book of James
I am working on a deep study of the book of James and as part of that project I have committed to reading various commentaries and this month made my way through the following:
Hopefully, this month will bring some more good readings about this wonderful book of the New Testament.
Other Commentaries and Theological Works
  • Great Thinkers: Karl Marx by William Dennison: Initially, I wasn’t sure that this series was a great idea, but after reading this short little book, I’m a fan. This is a well-written book that analyzes Karl Marx from a very Biblical perspective. You can read my longer review of the book here.
  • What about Free Will? Reconciling Our Choices with God’s Sovereignty by Scott Christensen: I finished this book up in January and it is by far the best treatment I have seen at trying to explain human free will with God’s sovereignty. I highly recommend it.
  • Obadiah: Zondervan Exegetical Commentary by Daniel Block: Perhaps it’s not normal to just read through commentaries. I don’t know, but I sometimes enjoy them. This one has been on my shelf for awhile, it’s short, and it’s about a book that I know little about. So I picked it up as I read the book of Obadiah this month. I’m not sure I can agree with some of the conclusions, partly because I am wrestling with the author’s dating of Obadiah, but it’s still opened up the book for me.
  • Kiss the Wave by Dave Furman: Dave Furman has written an excellent book on trusting God in the midst of trials. It’s not one of general advice or Christian euphemisms, but one that is practical and theological. You can read my review here.
Other Books:
  • The Greatest Knight by Thomas Asbridge: A fascinating look into the life of a knight in the medieval times, Asbridge follows the story of William Marshall
  • Serpent by Clive Cussler: I enjoy Clive Cussler’s writings, and for this month picked up the first book in his NUMA series. They aren’t typical mysteries but offer unique plot lines.
  • The Pilgrim’s Digress by Benjamin Szumskyj: The author places Christian attention on why we should or should not read fantasy or horror books. While I was looking forward to the book, I was disappointed as the book was more legalistic than anything. You can read my review here.
  • Still Pickled by Brian Crane: As part of my reading challenge every year, I try to read one book of comics. I don’t know about you, but I used to look forward to the stories of Pickles in the weekly comics in the paper. So it was fun to see a whole book of them.
  • One Thousand Risks by Chad Johnson: I was asked to review this book, and did so with some hesitancy. I was greatly disappointed and concerned. Therefore, I wouldn’t recommend you read this book. You can read my review here.
And that’s my reading for the month, and now we get into February for more reading. What’s your reading plan for the month?